OASI: Can it be prevented?

VIEW THE RECORDED EVENT BELOW:

 

*** WARNING OF GRAPHIC PHOTO OF A BIRTH INJURY IN THE FIRST PRESENTATION***

A multidisciplinary webinar organised by the MASIC Foundation with leading speakers, reflecting the diverse professional roles required to coordinate and deliver effective and individualised care for women experiencing Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury (OASI) and their consequences.

This webinar concentrates on prevention of 3rd and 4th degree tears.

There are discussions on:

Who is at Risk, are the Rates Rising and what are the consequences?

The OASI Care Bundle and Lessons Learnt and the benefits of using Episcissors.

A MASIC Advocate bravely shares her own traumatic story of the impact of an instrumental delivery and 3c tear.

Co-Chaired by Professor Bob Freeman, Consultant Gynaecologist at University Hospitals Plymouth & Executive Trustee for The MASIC Foundation and Joanna Prance Personal Trainer, MASIC Advocate and Inspirational blogger (@colostomummy).

With presentations from Mr. Abdul H. Sultan, Consultant Obstetrician and Urogynaecologist at Croydon University Hospital and Honorary Reader at St George’s University of London, Dr Posy Bidwell, Midwife and Clinical Research Fellow for the OASI 1 project and Magda Jurczuk, OASI 2 Research Fellow.

Sponsors: Epissors, MacGregor Healthcare ltd, Axonics, THD and Coloplast.
Webinar produced by Event 7.

 

 

Looking for support?

There is support available if you need it, don’t suffer in silence and don’t be afraid to ask for help and advice.

MASIC can help you over come the physical and emotional trauma you may have experienced during and after child birth. We can support you and guide you to helpful resources, all you need to do is get in touch.

Not sure where to start?

Please call the MASIC 24h freephone Birth Injury Support Helpline 0808 1640 8333

The stats speak for themselves.
More women are affected and need support…

85%

of women with severe birth injury said it impacted on their relationship with their child

78%

were affected by traumatic memories of the birth

52%

stated they were embarrassed by the symptoms of their injury

49%

of women affected said they doubted their ability to mother

45%

suffered postnatal depression as a result of their injury

24%

of women affected regretted having a child because of the injuries sustained